Selected pieces from demagnetized tapes – Vol. 1

 

 

 

 

Selected pieces from demagnetized tapes on The New Post-literate: A Gallery Of Asemic Writing, Michael Jacobson editor.

Transcripts from demagnetized tapes, Vol. 1, foreword by Sloan De Villo, LN 2021, ISBN 979-8688757347 [Asemic-Concrete-Eng]
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Transcripts from demagnetized tapes – Vol. 1

Transcripts from demagnetized tapes, Vol. 1, foreword by Sloan De Villo, LN 2021, ISBN 979-8688757347 [Asemic-Concrete-Eng]
buy: Lulu | amazon.com | .uk • read: archive | behance | download

Asemic writing and visual poetry are inherently connected, and the relationship is symbiotic. Thus it is not at all surprising that typewriter-generated concrete poetry (ironically considered by some to be obsolete) is re-emerging in new forms and with considerable vitality in the asemic writing movement.
Federico Federici is one of the master practitioners of this interesting sub-genre. (He is also contributing to my long-held theory of Neo-Concretism.) That contemporary asemic writers and artists should benefit from the triumphs of the “Golden Age” of concrete poetry is, after all, an indication of healthy cultural evolution: a balance of tradition and the iconoclastic.
Working in the context of concrete poetry, Federico Federici uses type-overs (as well as some calligraphy) to generate asemic symbols and structures. I believe this is one of the most promising possibilities for the use of concrete poetry in the asemic realm: The generation of symbols and structures.
Federici also interjects words – mostly nouns – to allow for some degree of “reading” and association. A nature theme emerges: “TREE,” “weed,” “wood,” “leaf,” “deer,” “stone,” etc. The work can be read, but not strictly in a conventional sense. For instance, traditional syntax is lacking yet the sign-system is intact for individual words. Poetically, the work presents a severely fractured pastoral lyric that is neither highly Romanticized nor parodied.
The typewritten structure suggests linearity; however, I believe the piece requires a “depth-of-field” reading. (Both asemics and vispo require new kinds of reading.) One is directed to look into and through the dense layering (not across).
Federici’s asemic-concrete composition implies, I believe, that a “text” is a dense field of accumulated meanings. Meanings can be distorted, obscured or disrupted by others. Emotional response competes with rationality. Linear (conventional) reading is misreading and misleading. True understanding of the text involves seeing into its depth and layers of possibility. The play of these layers of meaning, in turn, creates new meanings. Federici’s work, indeed, uses a randomness principle. The precise geometry of concrete poetry obscures the randomness and creates a deconstructive tension in the work.
The asemic text demands a new kind of “reading” and finding meaning. Federico Federici’s work helps open new possibilities.

Sloan De Villo

The Cecil Touchon Asemic Reader

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The Cecil Touchon Asemic Reader stands as some sort of data storage device, capable of hosting and properly displaying a variety of solid textual environments and set on discovering the way language naturally tends to abstraction and contradiction, the two together being its generative seeding. Openly challenging and overstepping the saturated mass media input-output system of consumption and production, Touchon seems to offer a thorough list of implicit instructions and poetical how-tos to conceptually work around the snare of an old, yet unanswered aporia: is text the obverse or reverse of an image? Is it true the opposite? “This side of card is for address” – an envelope reads, but the address points to nowhere on Earth, for to make reality real again, it must first be disavowed. Touchon’s creative logic works within these interstices of language to breach the borders and extend investigation beyond naïve interpretations of common goings-on and far beyond pure linguistics, though reality is the realm of language. The reader is thus a tool, a recipient and a sender at the same time, always involved in the process that makes the whole device work.
The very first page sets a purely asemic routine, which the subsequent works put into play. Ripped finds from old poetry books and journals, stamped envelopes and scores, all have become the bedrock the asemic practice erodes. Though a strict protocol cannot be established, other than the blue fingerprint at the right bottom corner of the first few pages, a rather recognizable rhythm of dots, lines and arrows pointing right, drives to the subsequent bloc of writings, opening with a carefully erased text. Few residual elements surface: “[…] the […] it […] )”. The pages that follow are crammed with broader and broader gaps as to suggest the presence of something intrinsically meaningful to be rooted out, as if they were semantically sampled by some mobile pointer. Erasure marks slowly turn into asemic fringes and gratings diffracting textual elements. See-through words and other identifiers resemble particles and micro-structures from within the living membrane of textual reality. The reader accesses new signification through this warped perspective of language which, in turn, extends the realm of creation.
In the last sections, the space of writing and the act of writing both undergo shifts, contractions and morphisms that push the original typographic structures of single words, sentences or of whole bulks of text to a critical point. This scathing montage actually attains poetic accumulation by way of endless deletions and duplications. The fragmented word-form connections tend to evoke the notion of space-text itself as a zone of progressive stratification and superposition. This multilayered technique subsumes as many layers of interpretations, as many spaces of truth. Language is not an immobile concept, but what lies below a word if not another word to disarm or erase?

Federico Federici,
Berlin, March 3, 2019

In The Cecil Touchon Asemic Reader by Cecil Touchon, Post-Asemic Press 2019, ISBN 978-1732878891.

A note about “Works and interviews” by Michael Jacobson

Works and interviews by Michael Jacobson is a collection of both asemic scripts (The Giant’s Fence, Action Figures, A Headhunter’s Tale), interviews and other textual installations (THAT: A Planet, The Paranoia Machine, MK JCBSN).
The first three sections challenge the reader to enter a net of finely entangled patterns and explore the residual signs of plots, which the paranoid characters, once inhabiting there, left deliberately behind.
Page after page, a carousel of abandoned or accidental symbols, of dreams cropped from a broader vision is delivered to the brain, which is supposed to edit and reassemble them into full narrative frameworks. Readers turn into spies collecting evidences of the impenetrable shelter of meaning. They may even find themselves connected to peripheral cameras, recording the relentless brain activities on the verge of dreaming.
Under a different perspective, the storytelling approach of this book convincingly relies on a cornerstone of asemic practice: however paradoxical it may seem, the intrinsic coherence of asemicism generates meaningfulness while stimulating the aptitude of readers to scan symbols in a meaningful way.
Asemic works act as blank tapes, simultaneously activated, recorded and erased again while watched. Each reader is, as such, an accomplice of the writer and possibly its desired alter ego.
A mirror is not an image in itself, but it has the property of imaging, likewise each asemic text does not exhibit a meaning of its own, but it is some sort of filter, capable of simulating and stimulating meaningfulness, engaging the reader into this unprecedented task.

Federico Federici

More about the book on Post-Asemic Press and on Michael Jacobson.