Drowned Poem

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Concrete asemic poetry! – Michael Jacobson

Federici has written a text of concrete poetry that extends itself all the way into asemic writing. Ultimately this book shines a light on the collapse of words and verbal communication, as if the concrete and the asemic were a swirling binary code unto themselves, living as a poetic thing, never dead but constantly being altered and altering the other. Yes walls collapse and so do languages. Writing systems disappear. Graffiti is painted over. The Berlin wall itself being the ultimate page and scar, leaving us with the question of what comes next now that the page is gone, and the asemic and concrete have run their course. Federici’s book suggests that after the wall comes down we are left with a poetry heavy with mashed up typography and information. These are beautiful poems searching for freedom, and they document the duality of the physical natural world becoming digital echoes written on a computer. I am glad this book is a physical book; it gives me hope that writing will continue to strive for new forms of expression yet not forget its history and where it came from. I recommend this book to poets, artists, typographers, cryptographers, and anyone with an interest in asemic writing.

Michael Jacobson

The way I discovered the Berlin wall has fallen, lulu.com, Morrisville 2017 (Eng-Asemic). ISBN: 978-0244930172
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Post-bop


This collection of sheets is a purely asemic tone poem, sketching the mood of the first man to stand erect, taking inspiration from the musically depicted portrait given by Charles Mingus, in his Pithecanthropus Erectus.
Aiming at dealing with the story of mankind in its own way, asemic writing seemed the most appropriate choice, insisting upon semiotics, rather than idioms.
Overcome with his alleged superiority over the trees, likewise standing erect, but unmoving in the background, and over the animals, still in a prone position, man first conceived of conquering the Earth, then of eventually ruling Nature.
Given these assumptions, his sought emancipation led to solitude and self-enslaving.
As the original jazz suite, this poem can be loosely divided into four movements:
evolution, p. 11–23
superiority-complex, p. 24–47
decline, p. 48–53
destruction, p. 54–58
The first movement sets the elementary shapes (dots, stains, lines), which get later on, in the second movement especially, organized into more complex dynamic structures or repeated solos.
The introduction to the third movement, instead, registers a much more organic disturbance in the whole pattern. Further attempts to regain control over that first frantic signs of crisis fail.
The fourth movement is again based on the third, except that it develops into an increasing complexity ending with blank language lines, resembling those on page 28 and 29, but somehow unnaturally upwards, no longer organized into blocks.
The final, definite climax is a white fallout, an unexpressed ultimate (or even anew primordial) act.

Federico Federici
London, Coldharbour Lane

Liner notes for a Pithecanthropus Erectus sketchbook, with a foreword by SJ Fowler, lulu.com, Morrisville 2018, (Eng-Asemic). ISBN: 978-0244999049
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Some notes on the not missing link – SJ Fowler


My feeling on the poems is that they are a cohesive set, yet each has its own identity. How much time the reader spends with each is up to them, but they might spend hours, or seconds, with each or with all. How rare is a clear control of the pansemic aesthetic? Essentially it seems as though Federico’s poems are often the evocation of a structure evading itself, an exact match to what Mingus declared his piece was about – a ten minute tone poem. Certainly in terms of actual construction Federico is also providing a score, a rescoring of that which been unscored. Here is metaphorical language without semantics. Ambiguous detail activating the poetic. The work is remarkable precisely because it works in a graceful, familiar space to do often stark and unfamiliar things. Like jazz that absorbs sound. This feels to me a faithful act towards listening and the intention towards possibility and inspiration. The roll, the smudge, the dead signature. The cut in the scrawl. The squig. The line, cards and bled ink. Sounds on paper.

SJ Fowler

Liner notes for a Pithecanthropus Erectus sketchbook, with a foreword by SJ Fowler, lulu.com, Morrisville 2018, (Eng-Asemic). ISBN: 978-0244999049
buy: barnes&noble | amazon.it | .com.de | .es | .uk