breath data death

The breath data death work here presented follows the protocol of a standard research paper and offers the most accurate possible record of a textual kinetic installation. As extensively discussed in it, code poetry is addressed in many regards: a pure code, capable of driving a sensor to collect data from the environment; an allegedly working do-while loop, to account for the reading of the one-word poem 78 shifts of breathing; a LaTeX file, compiled to the pdf which the report consists of, exploiting specifically designed packages to produce the scatter plots and visual poems which, side by side, document the impact of the spoken word “breath” on air molecules.
The images in the results section do not actually exist as standalone ones. They are illegible strings of mathematical formulas seeded with the sampled voltage data and a small random parameter to add unlimited degrees of complexity and potentially generate new poetical arrangements every time the file is compiled.

Full project here:
ABC – avantgarde-boot-camp, «Perspektive», Sylvia Egger editor, 2020

Concrete asemic poetry! – Michael Jacobson

Federici has written a text of concrete poetry that extends itself all the way into asemic writing. Ultimately this book shines a light on the collapse of words and verbal communication, as if the concrete and the asemic were a swirling binary code unto themselves, living as a poetic thing, never dead but constantly being altered and altering the other. Yes walls collapse and so do languages. Writing systems disappear. Graffiti is painted over. The Berlin wall itself being the ultimate page and scar, leaving us with the question of what comes next now that the page is gone, and the asemic and concrete have run their course. Federici’s book suggests that after the wall comes down we are left with a poetry heavy with mashed up typography and information. These are beautiful poems searching for freedom, and they document the duality of the physical natural world becoming digital echoes written on a computer. I am glad this book is a physical book; it gives me hope that writing will continue to strive for new forms of expression yet not forget its history and where it came from. I recommend this book to poets, artists, typographers, cryptographers, and anyone with an interest in asemic writing.

Michael Jacobson

The way I discovered the Berlin wall has fallen, lulu.com, Morrisville 2017 (Eng-Asemic). ISBN: 978-0244930172
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