Finds of silence – Funde der Stille

genre: objects
technic: installation/archive
material: organic
year: 2016 – ?
ongoing archive on Behance
exhibition: “Stille”, Group Global 3000, Berlin, (13.01 – 10.03.2017)
qr

ABSTRACT

Trees act as living antennas, collect mechanical stimuli from air and soil pressure, adjust their freshly sprouted architecture, embody prints in the slow, continuous growth of their permanent structures. The back and forth vibration of particles, regardless of whether they belong to air, soil or whatever else, affects the living things embodied in the medium.
Each single cell hears sound, in the overall state of tension or slack a tree is capable of. Sound is an active force which constantly tends to shape things, leaving unexpected folds within vibrating structures. Silence, whose boundaries avoid tracing, hides somewhere within and around each shaped thing. It is the haunting, ultimate message morphed into dead trees transformed into a fortuitous sculptural medium.

Jede einzelne Zelle hört Geräusche, ob der Baum angespannt oder entspannt ist. Schall ist eine aktive Kraft, die unaufhörlich die Dinge formt und in schwingenden Strukturen unerwartete Falten finden lässt. Stille, deren Grenzen keine Spuren hinterlassen, verbirgt sich irgendwo innerhalb und um jede geformte Sache. Sie ist die eindringliche, letzte Botschaft, die in tote Bäume verwandelt wird, die wiederum in ein zufälliges plastisches Medium verwandelt sind.

STATEMENT

The project I am working on explores the tiniest effects of sound on living structures, once they have come to death in their physical environment.

Surfaces are microscopically stressed and rearranged by the impact of sound. I started out recording evidences of this phenomenon in both urban/pseudo-urban settlements and in the wild. The open archive to be arranged aims to inspire inner silence by the neat recollection of the sound freezed into roots, gemmas, barks, leaves and so forth, while providing the most information about each find and its discovery.

Trees act as living antennas. They collect mechanical stimuli from air and soil pressure, adjust their freshly sprouted architecture, embody prints in the slow, continuous growth of their permanent structures. The back and forth vibration of particles, regardless of whether they belong to air, soil or whatever else, affects the living things embodied in the medium. Each single cell hears sound, in the overall state of tension or slack a tree is capable of.

Piezoelectric microphones would transduce structure-borne sound, mapping local, real-time vibrations into noise, or noise music. Sound never disappears completely though. Its imprints remain as subtle, unexpected folds within vibrating structures. That is where I learned silence: from observing fallen beeches on the Melogno hill, or dead standing limes along suburban boulevards in Berlin. Dead trees keep finds of silence.

In this preliminary part of the project, I question the beechwood along the path of the High Lands, in the western ligurian Apennines. Further investigations will address the trees in Milan, Berlin and along the A10 and A6 highways.

Silence, whose boundaries avoid tracing, is the haunting, ultimate message morphed into the structures of a dead tree transformed into a fortuitous sculptural medium. The phenomenon to be observed challenges the pure representation of facts and needs the deliberate displacement of the spectator’s angle of vision out of the bare encounter with a residual, isolated dead structure in an art context.
Sound is addressed as an active force which constantly tends to shape things, while silence hides somewhere within and around each shaped thing.
The concise captions provided should help finds to be properly identified and encompass the very starting point of a possible narrative. Some implicit and seemingly acoustic relationship should then be established and the old retinal image persist as an empty stage only.

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